Katherine the Great
I like to think of myself as a storyteller. Mostly I tell stories about knitting.

While knitting green socks for Hunter Hammersen, there was a moment I fracking hated them. Not because the pattern is poorly written, but because I could NOT for the life of me remember the difference between a make one left and a make one right.

I see a \ on a chart and I immediately think ssk (you can draw an S out of a \). I see a / and immediately k2tog (you can draw a K out of a /, kind of).

I could not, for the life of me, see a y or a flipped y and think anything other than “crap, I have to look up the make ones again”…..and to be clear, I wasn’t having to look it up once a row. I was having to look it up for every. single. make one.

Finally, almost to the heel of the second sock I thought, “this is bat guano, there has to be a way to remember this” and I stopped knitting until I figured out the backwards y looks kind of like a B which tells me to pick up the ladder from the Back and knit through the front. (This is a M1R because the little line is off to the right.)

How to tell M1L from M1R in charts

The y looks like a backwards F so I need to pick up the ladder from the Front and knit through the back. (This is a M1L because the little line is off to the left)

Then, I knit happily ever after.green socks


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Eine Antwort

  1. Bonnie says:

    I read somewhere that the angled line shows you which way the tip of your right needle is pointed. For M1R, your needle tip is going to the right when you put it through the picked up yarn. For M1L, your needle tip is going to the left when you put it through the picked up yarn.
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